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of government response, that technology is really just a piece of the answer. you need to have technology on your networks help identify when there's a breach to give you much greater understanding about what's happening on your networks, to look for these intrusions and these incursions into your network. that is a piece of the solution, and part of it is the caller said is really having the discussion with nations that are aggressively pursuing this. there are dozens of countries have these electronic espionage capabilities in place. a specific programs where they're targeting western networks exfiltrate data to empower their private sector, to empower their manufacturing base, the retail base, the research and development programs. they're doing at the expense of the american taxpayer. >> host: where is congress on the cybersecurity legislation? >> guest: there are more than 40 bills right now that are on the hill. covering a whole range of cybersecurity issues. some of these bills have been bouncing around for five years or more. and i recognize understand it's an incredibly complex i
has fallen off the table. we have the technology now to make this information available almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic line. good morning, lynette. caller: i have not been watching
be a light footprint with technological containment of the problem. when i hear $3.3 trillion, i hear the bulk of it is because of what happened on 9/11. my question is, in the new normal, what is the role for militant extremism? is it releasing them from jail and giving them a space and controlling them technologically? thank you. >> i will star with the last. if you think the light footprint strategy is all about containment, then it does raise the question of what are the limits of light footprint? what have we discovered it does not do terribly well? it does not build justice or build the kind of global development that paula was discussing before. it deliberately pulls the united states back from a kind of the engagement that we thought in the post-cold war world that we were heading into. and frankly, you might of thought we were heading into it just listening to president obama during the 2008 campaign when he talked mostly about engagement strategy. we did not hear a lot of discussion about what we have all been talking about here today. i think the fact that we have seen the
. if you talk to some very high technology firms, they will say, sorry, we cannot find enough specialized mathematician's or specialized engineers or an agricultural worker will say we have 7.9% unemployment but i cannot find enough people to help me take care of my harvest. we have 7.9% unemployment, but we do not have enough people in the transportation and logistics arena. perhaps high school kids -- high-school graduates do not want to be truckdrivers these days. they do not want to go back to the farm. it is not totally even. there is evidence that suggests very strongly that immigrants actually take up the slack. they do not compete necessarily with jobs already taken. another of many advantages of legalizing is that wages will have to go up. they will have to formally pay taxes, formally pays social security. the system will be level. there is one thing you said that i think at the core of this. i think it is and a wonderful insight. as the government is getting larger -- and the government is getting larger. the government has grown a four percentage points of gdp in the last four
poorly on the president? >> i'm afraid i blame everything on technology. i don't think this is an unusual thing to happen. it's just that we have a complete electronic trail. i think for thousands of years you've had adultery and all these things. >> brian: you're talk being the actual act. i'm talking about the president knowing. >> i'm also saying i don't think the president would know. you wouldn't have the f.b.i. investigating the c.i.a. if you didn't have all this electronic trail to follow. i don't think you would have all that. >> brian: but this is something that results in some type of blackmail in. >> yes. >> brian: that's the -- >> that's the problem. you have peter king, chairman of the homeland security committee in the house suggesting that perhaps general petraeus' testimony to them was compromised, briefing was compromised. >> brian: because that testimony included? >> the cover-up line about benghazi, which is that this was somehow part of a massive mob stimulated by the -- >> brian: a democrat said this hit me like a lightning bolt. they should have been briefed. >> we k
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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